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Vaccination against FIE has been very successful. Your cat should be protected against those diseases which are most common, highly contagious, and which cause serious illness or death. Some boosters can now be given every three years, depending on the lifestyle of your cat. Feline calicivirus and feline rhinotracheitis are the two viruses most commonly responsible for upper respiratory infections in cats. This virus is a significant cause of suffering and death in cats around the world. In cats which do survive, recovery is often very slow. Such diseases include feline panleucopaenia, cat flu which may be caused by feline herpesvirus, feline calicivirus and feline leukaemia.

Access to food and water and a comfortable area to rest are usually all that is required for a quick recovery. An occasional kitten may retain interfering levels of maternal antibodies beyond 12 weeks in exceptional cases. Following vaccination your cat may be off-colour for a day or two, or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. Access to food and water and a comfortable area to rest are usually all that is required for a quick recovery. After Vaccination Care Following vaccination, your cat may be off-colour for a day or two, or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. It is very contagious and the death rate is high, especially under 12 months of age. Cats that recover from this virus can become re-infected later if exposed.

A significant number of cats in the region have tested positive for feline AIDs (FIV) so the risk of contracting the incurable disease are high if your cat goes outside. Access to food and water and a comfortable area to rest are usually all that is required for a quick recovery. Following vaccination your cat may be off-colour for a day or two, or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. Even if a cat recovers, it can remain a carrier for life. The feline distemper vaccine (FVRCP) is strongly recommended for all cats. Following vaccination your cat may be off-colour for a day or two, or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. There is an actual advisory board in my veterinary world called the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) that has an actual report about feline vaccinations.

Access to food and water and a comfortable area to rest are usually all that is required for a quick recovery. Following vaccination your cat may be off-colour for a day or two, or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. In cat terms that means sharing food and water bowls, scratch matches, bite fights and even grooming can unfortunately lead to contracting FIV. Following vaccination your cat may be off-colour for a day or two, or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. Cat flu is a syndrome which can be caused by both feline herpesvirus and feline calicivirus. After Vaccination Care Following vaccination your cat may be off-colour for a day or two, or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. Kittens need a course of vaccinations starting at nine weeks of age.

Following vaccination your cat may be off-colour for a day or two, or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. Following vaccination your cat may be off-colour for a day or two, or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. Some cats also require additional vaccines for FIV (Feline Immunodeficieny Virus, or feline AIDS) and FeLV (Feline Leukemia Virus). Three vaccinations, 2-4 weeks apart, against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are recommended at or after 8 weeks of age. Very young or old cats can develop pneumonia, which can be fatal in some cases. Three vaccinations, 2-4 weeks apart, against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are recommended at or after 8 weeks of age. Three vaccinations, 2-4 weeks apart, against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are recommended at or after 8 weeks of age.

Three vaccinations, 2-4 weeks apart, against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are recommended at or after 8 weeks of age. However, usually you will not let your kitten outside until neutered at 6 months old. Cats that do recover may continue to carry the virus for some time and infect other cats. Adult Cat Vaccination The immunity from kitten vaccination weakens over time and your pet can again become susceptible to disease. The vaccines against rabies and feline herpesvirus induced a significant immune response in the tigers and lions. Our ‘Kitten Pack’, which will be presented to you at your first visit with us, will outline the appropriate vaccination protocol for your kitten or cat. It is then time to begin vaccination.

By convention, in the UK, most kittens have their first vaccination at 9 weeks and the second at 12 weeks.