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It is helpful if you have your medication – and/or the leaflet that came with it – with you while you fill out the report. Your contact details as the reporter of the side-effect. The name of the medicine which you think caused it. The side-effect. You can do this online at the following web address: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard. You can do this online at the following web address: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard. Read the leaflet inside the medication packet for a full list of possible side-effects.

Feeling sick (nausea), being sick (vomiting), diarrhoea, and tummy (abdominal) pain, as well as skin rashes (including photosensitivity and itching) are the most common side-effects. In any other situation – an earlier primary infection or a history of recurrent episodes – the risk to the baby is low and your specialist will advise on possible options. If you do have a recurrent episode when you go into labour, you should discuss your options with your specialist and together decide the best way that your baby should be delivered. If you do have a recurrent episode when you go into labour, you should discuss your options with your specialist and together decide the best way that your baby should be delivered. For most women with recurrent genital herpes, it is felt to be safe to have a normal vaginal delivery. Antiviral medicines such as aciclovir have not been found to be harmful to the baby when taken during pregnancy. In addition, your doctor may advise that you should take antiviral medication in the last four weeks of pregnancy to help prevent a recurrence of herpes at the time of childbirth.

This helps the sores to clear quickly. As long as there are two months between your catching the virus and giving birth to your baby, a normal vaginal delivery is likely to be safe for the baby. However, if you decide against a caesarean section and decide to opt for a vaginal birth, the specialist is likely to recommend that you be given antiviral medication (usually aciclovir). This will greatly reduce the chance of the baby coming into contact with the virus (mainly in the blisters and sores around your genitals). Therefore, in this situation your specialist is likely to recommend that you have a caesarean section delivery. In this situation there is about a 4 in 10 chance of the baby developing a herpes infection. If you develop a first episode of genital herpes within the final six weeks of your pregnancy, or around the time of the birth, the risk of passing on the virus to your baby is highest.

If you develop a first episode of genital herpes within the final six weeks of your pregnancy, or around the time of the birth, the risk of passing on the virus to your baby is highest. A specialist will normally advise about what to do if you develop genital herpes whilst you are pregnant, or if you have recurrent genital herpes and become pregnant. A specialist will normally advise about what to do if you develop genital herpes whilst you are pregnant, or if you have recurrent genital herpes and become pregnant. A specialist will normally advise about what to do if you develop genital herpes whilst you are pregnant, or if you have recurrent genital herpes and become pregnant. (A first episode of genital herpes is also called a primary episode.) A five-day course of treatment is usual but this may be extended by a few days if blisters are still forming. An antiviral medicine is commonly prescribed for a first episode of genital herpes. An antiviral medicine is commonly prescribed for a first episode of genital herpes.

It is thought that these medicines all work as well as each other when used to treat genital herpes. If an antiviral medicine is started early in an episode of symptoms, it tends to reduce the severity and duration of symptoms during an episode of genital herpes. They do not clear the virus from the body. They work by stopping the herpes virus from multiplying. They work by stopping the herpes virus from multiplying. See separate leaflet called Genital Herpes for more general details on genital herpes infection. This leaflet just discusses antiviral medication for genital herpes.

This leaflet just discusses antiviral medication for genital herpes. This leaflet just discusses antiviral medication for genital herpes. If symptoms occur, they can range from a mild soreness to painful blisters on the genitals and surrounding area. If symptoms occur, they can range from a mild soreness to painful blisters on the genitals and surrounding area. Genital herpes is usually a sexually transmitted infection. Genital herpes is usually a sexually transmitted infection. It is caused by the herpes simplex virus.

The buttocks and anus may also be affected. They work by stopping the virus from multiplying, which reduces the duration and severity of symptoms.