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In 1962 while watching a bullfight in Tijuana, Mexico, Jewish trumpeter and A&M Records co-founder Herb Alpert was inspired to capture the excitement and mariachi horn section he experienced at the bullring. Herb Alpert (born March 31, 1935) is an American musician most associated with the group variously known as Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass, or TJB. Overview Herb Alpert (born March 31, 1935 in Los Angeles, California) is an American musician most associated with the Tijuana Brass, a now-defunct brass band … In 1974, Herb recorded a new album, You Smile-The Song Begins and formed a new band to tour and promote the album. Herb Alpert (born March 31, 1935 in Los Angeles, California) is an American musician most associated with the Tijuana Brass, a now-defunct brass band of which he was leader. Coming on February 24, the next reissues from Herb Alpert include the acclaimed Herb Alpert/Hugh Masekela album, Bullish, and Blow Your Own Horn. Unlikely 1960s hitmakers mixed elements of rock, swing, cool jazz, and pop, all with a distinctive Mexican/Mariachi tinge.

!!Going Places!! Creator and innovator, musician and producer, artist, and philanthropist, Herb Alpert is a man with a profound passion. Volume 2 is the second album by Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, known in this recording as “Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass”. What Now My Love is the sixth album by Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, released in 1966. South of the Border is the third album by American easy listening brass band Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, originally released in 1964. Correction: “A&M Classics Vol. The Lonely Bull, released in 1962, is the debut album from Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass, and was also the first album ever released by A&M Records – which was co-founded by Alpert and Jerry Moss.

S.R.O., issued in 1966, was Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass’ seventh album.[1] It included work by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, as well as the band’s cover of “Mame” (from the hit musical of the same name), one of the first TJB recordings to include vocals from Alpert, as he and the group sang the song’s chorus in the middle of the otherwise-instrumental rendition. Released in 1970, a bit too late to capitalize on the Tijuana Brass at the peak of their appeal, this early hits collection compounded the error of its tardy timing by only including selections from the TJB’s first five albums. The film was produced by Paramount Pictures. Alpert transports you to the hopeful and simpler era of the early 60’s. Sounds Like… The Western motif on the double-fold album jacket — with Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass in costume — signals this as another companion album to a TV special. Q.

Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass was an ATV color production for ‘ITC world wide distribution’ television variety special starring Herb Alpert and his Tijuana Brass band, which aired on October 13, 1974. Christmas Album is a late-1968 album by Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass. Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass were rolling right down the middle of the American pop scene like a locomotive in 1966 — and this album captures them at the peak of their exuberance. The album, released in 1970 on the A&M label, features a compilation of 12 of the most popular and readily recognized pieces by the band. Herb Alpert’s Ninth is a 1967 album by Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass. Back in the late 1950’s through the early 1960’s, Herb Alpert tried his hand at recording and writing songs, including a couple of vocal efforts under the name of Dore Alpert. By late 1966, it seemed as if every TV commercial and every pop arranger had latched onto the Herb Alpert “Ameriachi” sound — at which point the resourceful originator of that sound began to pare it down and loosen it up a bit.

Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass shed almost all of the dust of Tijuana on this mellow, richly textured album; one reviewer at the time wrote that Alpert seemed to have exchanged bullrings for wedding rings. A prototype of modern music videos, this is an animated film set to the music of two popular tunes recorded by Herb Alpert and his Latin-flavored brass ensemble – “Spanish Flea” and “Tijuana Taxi”. Herb Alpert turned to jazz’s Shorty Rogers — then toiling in the L.A. With this album, Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass settle into their hitmaking groove, the once strikingly eclectic elements of Dixieland, pop, rock, and mariachi becoming more smoothly integrated within Alpert’s infectious “Ameriachi” blend. The colossus that is A&M Records starts right here with the first album by the 1960s instrumental juggernaut known as the Tijuana Brass. Herb Alpert’s list of accomplishments is longer than, well, a trombone.