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Pubmed ID: 20204601 – Laser 904 nm action on bone repair in rats with osteoporosis. Light therapy may increase the rate of healing and reduce the time to heal in people with pressure ulcers. Light therapy may increase the rate of healing and reduce the time to heal in people with pressure ulcers. Light therapy may increase the rate of healing and reduce the time to heal in people with pressure ulcers. However, more research is needed to confirm these results. However, more research is needed to confirm these results. However, more research is needed to confirm these results.

Preliminary results suggest that bright light therapy may also help people with anorexia or night eating syndrome. Preliminary results suggest that bright light therapy may also help people with anorexia or night eating syndrome. Limited evidence shows that light therapy may help people with bulimia. Limited evidence shows that light therapy may help people with bulimia. However, results are inconclusive. However, results are inconclusive. Research suggests that light therapy may benefit women who have depression during the menstrual cycle or during pregnancy.

Research suggests that light therapy may benefit women who have depression during the menstrual cycle or during pregnancy. There is conflicting evidence for the use of light therapy in treating nonseasonal depression. Some results are still unclear and more research is needed to clarify these findings. Light therapy may be a good treatment option for sleep difficulties and may also improve behavioral and psychiatric disturbances. Combination therapy may be more effective than UVA, broadband UVB, and narrowband UVB alone. Light therapy may be used alone or in combination with other agents or treatments for vitiligo. Fluorescent light box is recommended, but optimal timing and length of light exposure vary between studies.


It has been used in combination with other treatments for long-term, major depressive disorder, and less severe depression that relates to seasonal changes. Light therapy is recommended as a first treatment option for people with SAD. There is strong evidence in support of the use of broadband UVA, narrowband UVB, and UVA1. Broadband UVA and UVA1 may be effective for damage deeper beneath the skin, while narrowband UVB therapy may be effective for damage closer to the surface. Broadband UVA and UVA1 may be effective for damage deeper beneath the skin, while narrowband UVB therapy may be effective for damage closer to the surface. Light therapy may benefit people with scleroderma. Light therapy using UVB or PUVA is considered one of the main treatment options for psoriasis.

Phototherapy is the first line treatment for babies with jaundice in both developed and developing countries of the world. Jaundice is a common problem for newborns during the first week of life. Narrowband UVB phototherapy has been found to be effective in the early stages of the disease. Additional research is warranted. Additional research is warranted. Light therapy may be considered as an alternative treatment for the herpes virus when drug therapy is not possible. More studies are needed comparing the effects of light therapy to those of other acne treatments.

Narrowband UVB phototherapy of wavelength 311 nanometers uses a smaller spectrum of light. Long-wavelength ultraviolet A light (UVA1, 340-400 nanometers) was developed as a “pure”, high intensity UVA source. Broadband UVA irradiation (315-400 nanometers) contains both UVA1 (340-400 nanometers) and UVA2 (315-340 nanometers). This treatment is usually used in people who do not respond to ultraviolet B therapy, and is used for different types of psoriasis. Ocular light therapy (OLT): Ocular light therapy delivers light and color through the eyes directly to the brain. Intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy: This therapy produces high intensity light over a short length of time. Balneophototherapy and bath PUVA phototherapy: This involves the use of long-wave ultraviolet (UV) radiation plus a psoralen (agent that increases light sensitivity) delivered in a diluted bath solution.

Devices may deliver phototherapy to the entire body or to a specific area (spot treatment). Effectiveness of phototherapy may depend on light energy and distance between the lamps and the person being treated. Later, Roman and Arab physicians introduced light therapy into general medical use. The use of light therapy in medicine has a long history. In general, studies on the use of light therapy have been small and poorly reported. Treatment with light has been extended to other conditions, including nonseasonal mood disorders, memory loss, circadian-related sleep disorders, and eating disorders. Light therapy is a first-line treatment for jaundice in newborns (yellowing of skin in babies), severe plaque psoriasis (flaky, itchy skin disease), and seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

Light therapy may be performed using lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), fluorescent lamps, dichroic lamps, or very bright full-spectrum light. Photochemotherapy, photodynamic therapy (PDT), photopheresis, ocular light therapy, and targeted light therapy, such as laser and intense pulsed light (IPL), will not be extensively discussed.