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Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this.

Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this.

Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this.


Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. Using a lip barrier cream available from your local pharmacist will help prevent this. In rare cases of gingivostomatitis, it’s possible for your lips to become stuck together in places. As with the treatment of cold sores, any pain or fever can be treated using ibuprofen or paracetamol. As with the treatment of cold sores, any pain or fever can be treated using ibuprofen or paracetamol. As with the treatment of cold sores, any pain or fever can be treated using ibuprofen or paracetamol.

As with the treatment of cold sores, any pain or fever can be treated using ibuprofen or paracetamol. As with the treatment of cold sores, any pain or fever can be treated using ibuprofen or paracetamol. This helps prevent secondary infections and will also control a build-up of plaque if you can’t brush your teeth effectively. Your GP may suggest using an antiseptic mouthwash. Your GP may suggest using an antiseptic mouthwash. Your GP may suggest using an antiseptic mouthwash. Brushing your teeth may also be painful because of the swelling of your gums.

Brushing your teeth may also be painful because of the swelling of your gums. Brushing your teeth may also be painful because of the swelling of your gums. If the infection is painful, your GP may suggest using a preparation that contains benzydamine, which is available as an oral rinse or oral spray, to help relieve any pain in your mouth or throat. Visit your GP if you or your child develops swollen, painful gums (gingivostomatitis) as a result of the primary herpes simplex infection. For example, if you develop herpetic keratoconjunctivitis – a secondary eye infection – you may need to see an ophthalmologist, a specialist eye doctor. The type of treatment recommended will depend on the severity of your cold sore symptoms and the complication that’s causing problems. Visit your GP if you’re at risk.

For example, your risk of developing encephalitis or the infection spreading to other parts of your body, such as your eyes, is increased. For example, your risk of developing encephalitis or the infection spreading to other parts of your body, such as your eyes, is increased. Speak to your GP if you have cold sores and you’re pregnant. Children under the age of 16 shouldn’t be given aspirin. However, don’t take ibuprofen if you have asthma or stomach ulcers, or you’ve had them in the past. Pain can also be treated with painkillers such as ibuprofen or paracetamol – both are available in liquid form for young children. These creams aren’t specifically designed to treat cold sores and won’t help them heal faster, but they may help ease any pain or irritation.

They’re an effective treatment for skin wounds and are placed over the cold sore to hide the sore area while it heals. Cold sore patches that contain a special gel called hydrocolloid are also available. Cold sore patches that contain a special gel called hydrocolloid are also available.